Category Archives: Lakes & Bays

Standup for the Cure – Positivity

You expect participants in a highly personal, built-for-connection event like Standup for the Cure to be enthusiastic and highly invested in experiencing a positive event. The surprise for me at the November 12 event at Miami Yacht Club was the attitude and absolute commitment of the sponsors. A lot of the praise for that goes to the tireless enthusiasm and work by event director, Dan Van Dyke (shown here leading the prayer circle).

sftcm2Before I go on and on about the weather for the event (absolutely stellar), the course (indescribably beautiful) and the raffle prizes (so many, and all so cool), I will introduce you to some of the many sponsors i enjoyed talking with.

The sun was bright so one of the first people I chatted with was Morgan Parker of Raw Elements, makers of clear and tinted sunscreen made with 100% natural ingredients including zinc oxide. The moisturizer was evident as I applied the clear stick blend to my face. They were at the event because, “It’s a great cause and a natural audience for our mission toward skincare and cancer prevention.”

Speaking of prevention, I experienced the quick and easy breast cancer screening available at no charge to all. In the course of the Standup for the Cure history hundreds upon hundreds of early stage cancers have been detected, with support and followup made available. Each $125 raised by the event is used to support someone in need for screening. With $850,000+ raised so far think of the positive impact the event has had for so many of us across the country. sftcmview

We all love the ocean, surfing and a great cause but we don’t all take action to make a difference. Two local high school students Jacy and Joie started SURF TO THE RESCUE at the end of their 2016 school year. These students donate proceeds to Surfers for Autism, except on Nov 12 all proceeds went to Standup for the Cure. The shirts are top quality and the logos unique – and their hearts are definitely in the right place.

sftcmhatBesides winning a very cool hat at the Ambry Genetics booth (answered questions about breast cancer correctly), I had a fantastic conversation with Jaci Talpash. Few could be more proud of the work done by their company. She shared so much about all Ambry Genetics does and I walked away grateful for all the teams behind the innovations and research.

The team from Cobian Footwear (check out the styles) lives their #everystepmatters message with their participation in causes that resonate.  Grag Tayler shared, “We are national sponsors of Standup for the Cure, so this is not a one time effort for us. They are honored to be part of the effort fighting breast cancer and those working to find a cure.

Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse fed us well with perfectly grilled burgers on melt in your mouth buns. Kona Brewing Company team froze their hands off reaching into a cooler full of ice to hand us perfectly chilled beer. We all needed it after an active morning. The morning was made more active for many as Andrew Crane representing Starboard  shared Allstar and Freeride boards, paddles, leashes and PFDs to dozens upon dozens of eager paddlers, both novice and super experienced racers. sftcmreeride

The most connected and positive community gathers at every Standup for the Cure event. Smiles were plentiful and awareness buzzed throughout the day. Thanks for inspiring us Shawneen Schweitzer Shelby Kailei Lane Schweitzer Zane Kekoa Schweitzer Matty Schweitzer Judie Vivian Dan Van Dyck and all the enthusiastic and loyal sponsors including
Ambry Genetics West Marine Maui Jim Cobian Kona Brewing Company sftcmona

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Miami Yacht Club

Surfrider Foundation Miami Chapter (No single use plastic bottles at the event – tons of awareness instead of tons of plastic).

sftcmsrBe sure to check out the schedule for an upcoming event and be sure to be part of exactly the energy our sport is known for.  Aloha!

 

Lake Powell Paddleboards: Bucket List to Wonder List

imageIt’s a tried and true, well-known aspiration – let’s see, do, experience or visit (fill in the blank) and check it off our “bucket list.” Ed and I headed to Lake Powell with our Starboard inflatable touring boards and a bucket list- slot canyon paddling experience in mind. Fortunately we had contacted Joe and Jordan at Lake Powell Paddleboards beforehand to schedule a one-day private trip.

img_0980From the first moment we walked into their shop we knew that Joe and Jordan had created a very special culture and vibe in Page, Arizona. The store was built out of a number of shipping containers, paneled with wood reclaimed from pallets and insulated with environmentally sound materials.

The photos just begin to tell the story.  Joe (behind the counter) is under a custom painted board, just one of many unique, one-of-a-kind objects and posters that tell the story of connection with community and water-athletes.

 

After falling spontaneously in love with the canyons and waters that make Lake Powell, they made a move based from their heart and a passion for standup paddling. Check out their website often. While they have an incredible service-based operation now – they envision so much more Lake Powell exploration and coolness coming in 2017.

img_0998We were so lucky to grab the last full-day adventure of their season. After a long and  busy spring-summer, Joe told us to be at the marina at 6:30 am because the beauty and glassiness of the water is prime at sunrise. No burn out or fatigue from Joe after all those busy weeks – he was no less in awe of the oranges that welcomed our day or the full moon setting as we hopped on the boat.img_0999

We got a “whack on the side of the head” from a day that turned all expectation on its ear. The best words I can use to describe the energy and magic that Joe and the team at Lake Powell Paddleboards brought to the experience are “a sense of wonder.” That and an absolute respect and love for Lake Powell.

We hadn’t motored 100 yards before Joe pulled out a fish net and picked up a floating bag of chips that apparently blew off a boat.  There was very little litter but he nabbed the few we saw. Not a word was said, but the respect was evident. And the “talk story” continued without a hiccup. We learned so much – what a day!

Our destination for the day was Labyrinth Canyon, a spot we could have reached in maybe a third of the time if we zoomed over with a focus on “arriving.” That’s not the experience we got – and for that we were beyond grateful. We meandered up river and learned the names of landmarks and formations along the way.  Boundary Butte and Dominguez Butte became familiar, as did Navajo Rock, Tower Rock and Gunsight. Joe shared so much insight about the water, the rocks, geology and canyons.img_1012

More than what we learned, we connected to the energy and awe in the magnificence of where we were.  Joe couldn’t hide   his enthusiasm if he wanted to.

We arrived as the solitary adventurers at the mouth of Labyrinth Canyon and secured the boat on the sand.

img_1013Yippee! It was paddle time. We got on our Riviera Voyager 12’6″ boards (awesome tracking and glide) and began the paddle into the canyon that became more narrow, incredible and “full of wonder” as we went. Maybe 2 miles into the canyon and it narrowed. The water ended at a small beach with a path that wound into the canyon ahead.

We left the boards and donned water shoes for what would be the most unexpected, amazing experience – again – instilling us with a child-like sense of “WOW!” that increased with every step.

The photos barely do justice to the texture, colors, ever-changing light and shadow. The vibration of the ages seemed to radiate from the twisting and turning serpentine hallways of ancient stone. image

At one point the air filled with a low thumping sound. We looked up and saw a Great Horned Owl swoop up then land on the canyon wall just overhead. As curious about us as we were about him, we enjoyed several minutes of shared stares. What a bonus.

Back to the water we began our paddle out of the more narrow canyon slots to the wider areas where the wind had picked up a bit.  With maybe 500 images captured by our cameras we were still remarking at every turn – “amazing!!!

imageAs we began our journey back to the dock enjoying lunch and “talk story” time we fully expected Joe to be more than ready to close down this final guided trip of the season. Not so. He had a few other spots to share.  We came around one rock outcropping to see a section of sky and clouds that dazzled.

Joe had seen the shot and let us snap more photos. At another area the water was more shades of absolutely clear blues and greens than you could imagine. Yes, it was October, but the day was warm, sunny and we had to leap in.img_1010

As we docked the boat at the end of the trip we knew this was not just a bucket list experience. We had a different spirit of wonder, a deeper respect for the area. Suddenly we wished for more time. You can schedule a multi-day guided experience for you and your friends and family. Don’t miss out.

You may be able to take a guided standup paddle trip in many different beautiful places. But if you are ever in the vicinity of  Lake Powell  don’t miss the chance to gain that kid-like grin, the custom experience and the customer service expertise that comes with a special discovery – Lake Powell Paddleboards.

 

Sunshine on a Rainy Day: SUP Magic

The day before we planned to head off on a 3-day camping trip – a trip with rain predicted at 90% the entire time (and 50 degrees) – I took a yoga class. This was not just any yoga class. It was the noon “Rejuv” taught by the brilliant, cool and gifted Cynthia LaRoche (GrooveYogaBend).  As she does so well, Cynthia led us through our restorative poses with wisdom and humor. Somewhere in the midst of it all she said something to the effect, “let what you don’t like be the teacher.” That was not the theme of the class, or even a large part of the message – but that is what resonated for me. clear4

I was going in to three days of camping in the rain with an attitude as bleak as the weather report.  For the most part, i do not like rain. Give me those blue sky days any time.  I was the prime example of what Sorine Cerin (Wisdom Collection: The Book of Wisdom) said, “Rain drops are not the ones who bring the clouds.”

clear5It was time for me to switch gears, be grateful for the opportunity of three days with friends, in the outdoors and in an incredibly beautiful part of the world. It was time for me to be open, to learn from what I basically did not believe that I liked.

Dana Arcuri says it so well, “The more you are grateful for what you have the more you can live fully in the present.”  That is my life journey, so practicing gratefulness and celebrating the present moment whatever it might be became my roadmap for the weekend. clear-lake-spring

What a gift!  In a 43 degree drizzle I dropped my husband and two buddies off to play golf and headed to Clear Lake, OR for a morning of paddling.  The experience was beyond expectation (what a truth) and a powerful lesson.

As Louise Erdich said, “I was in love with the whole world and all that lived in its rainy arms.”  From the light mist that welcomed my first paddle stroke, to the chilly downpour mid-paddle. Solitude and stillness, lush greens and every imaginable blue created magic.clear2

And guess what. The sun actually came out!

This post is a re-post of my story originally on my “Power of Presence” blog – meditations for SUP and Walking. Much mahalo to KIALOA and Sweet Waterwear for supporting P2SUP from the beginning.

Enjoy the video of the experience here: If you want to enjoy our P2Walk meditation, “Walk with Gratitude” explore this link.

Naish ONE: Alpine SUPping Robby Naish Style

Naish ONE inside, some snacks and a camera! Ready to go Alpine SUPping
Naish ONE inside, some snacks and a camera! Ready to go Alpine SUPping

Fall has hit the latitudes affected by winter snows and that shoulder season brrrr.  It’s our last chance to grab a backpack and hike to the alpine regions that are absolutely stunning this time of year. Our backpack gear is cool-to-the-max because tucked inside the pack is a Naish ONE!

Robby Naish says, ” I am constantly telling people about the many benefits of our inflatable stand up paddle boards.

Robbie Naish ready to Alpine SUP - Photos by Filip Zuan (www.filipzuan.com)
Robby Naish ready to Alpine SUP – Photos by Filip Zuan (www.filipzuan.com)

Here are a few shots from an Alpine SUP adventure in St. Moritz, Switzerland that never would have been possible with a composite board!

Where in the world is Robby Naish
Where in the world is Robby Naish

Every day on the water is a good day and with one of these, you can make that happen a lot more often!”

Find YOUR nearest alpine lake and let the hike-in Naish ONE adventure begin
Find YOUR nearest alpine lake and let the hike-in Naish ONE adventure begin
Secret Lake by Broken Top - Oregon Photo by Tyler Roemer
Secret Lake by Broken Top – Oregon Photo by Tyler Roemer

Our first Alpine SUP adventure to a breathtaking, incredible “secret” lake tucked behind Broken Top in Bend, OR was an adventure. (Story here). Discovering these lakes and taking the hike set the stage for the sweetest of paddles upon arrival. All you need is a map and a plan to discover these treasures.

We drove through frozen, rutted snow at the edge of a 3,000 ft drop cliff in the Steens in Eastern Oregon to find our alpine lake. We were headed for Wildhorse Lake but the 1,100 foot steep drop of the trail covered in ice was not something we wanted to attempt. (video below). Instead we found a terrific alpine lake to hike to – Fish Lake nestled among the Steens at an elevation of 7400 feet. Surrounded by a healthy stand of willows and aspens, here a wide variety of wildlife can be found including beavers further down Lake Creek below the lake. It was glassy calm, with the only ripples provided by the lake’s namesake – fish! And plenty of them.

Thanks to Naish SUP for sweet inflatables, KIALOA Paddles for design and technology, and the Beatles for the tunes in the video below.

 

Inspire Clean Rivers: Youth Video Voice

Got video camera, phone or GoPro? Want to go to the Jack Johnson concert in Bend, OR on August 24? Well here’s a contest that get you in the running for TWO FREE TICKETS!

If you love the water – oceans, bays, lakes and rivers – you want to do what you can to keep them clean and healthy. Your 1-2 minute video can show us all how YOU’D keep the Deschutes River clean and clear of beer bottles, flip flops, cans, and any sort of trash.  Many groups have organized around the goal of keeping rivers and streams healthy.  In Central Oregon we are exceptionally fortunate. We have had incredible river restoration, monitoring and youth education driven and inspired by the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council (UDWC). Now the UDWC has a contest that let’s YOU be part of the solution.

How would YOU inspire others to keep the Deschutes River clean - video ideas? Jack Johnson tickets? Yeah!
How would YOU inspire others to keep the Deschutes River clean – video ideas? Jack Johnson tickets? Yeah!

Hosmer Lake Shasek

The annual impact of their educational programs is beyond measure in terms on connecting youth to the environment, culture and sense of place our local waters provide. “The staff and volunteers continuously create programs and youth opportunities that celebrate every aspect of learning about our rivers and streams from writing to science to the arts.

Now for the FUN PART! Here are links to the UDWC “Keep the Deschutes River Clean” video contest. Be serious, funny, cute and clever in a 1-2 minute video, submit before August 1 and you have a chance to win 2 tickets to the Jack Johnson concert. PARENTS – you know you want to go to this sold out concert as much as your video-savvy kids do – so light a creative fire in them, take then to the river and hand them your iPhone – it’s gonna be fun.

The contest is open to all ages, read the rules and start filming, singing, dancing, cleaning the river, floating, paddling, fishing and making a great story.

Video Contest Submission Form and Rules
Video Contest Flyer 3

“Times Like These” by Jack Johnson
(We can change “what will be” by inspiring a clean river!)

In times like these
In times like those
What will be will be
And so it goes
And it always goes on and on…
On and on it goes

Naish ONE Hikes and Adventures

Photo by Tyler Roemer http://tylerroemer.blogspot.com/2013/05/mens-journal-notebook.html
Photo by Tyler Roemer http://tylerroemer.blogspot.com/2013/05/mens-journal-notebook.html

All over the world people are enjoying the SUP Perspective on lakes, rivers, bays, streams and the open ocean. We take our boards and paddles exploring, surfing and racing. For those of us with a history of back country skiing, hiking and backpacking there is another sort of SUP adventure that calls us. We have all found those hidden or remote  places that are not accessible by car and are too demanding for trekking in with our standup boards.

btnaishAll that changed for my husband, Ed and me when we got our Naish ONE inflatable 12’6″ board. Sure, we will be using it for race training and racing the N1SCO way, but it’s going to be for much more than that.  The Naish ONE comes tucked into its own backpack that fits comfortably on most anyone. It’s got room for the pump, fin and even your snacks and extra jacket. Take a look at out first exploration to an amazingly clear lake nestled in the volcanic wonderland that is Central Oregon.  Three thousand years ago lava flows from the High Cascades dammed the McKenzie River, creating a lake so clear, cold, and calm that ghostly tree snags are still visible under its 100-foot-deep waters. The stroll around Clear Lake offers lots of variety: huge springs, lava crossings, old-growth forests.  The paddle from the standing perspective is even more exquisite.

Take a look at our short video and then send us your story or video link – Where will YOUR Naish ONE take you? Endless access = endless wonder.

SUP: A Simple Paddle

When asked, ‘What did you do today,” most people might reply, “I went for a really nice paddle.”

End of story, and not bad.

This is not the way our friend Steve will reply.  Steve, and his wife, Laurie, not only seem to enjoy 23.5  hours of each 24 hour day, but they do it with incredible gusto.

Tongue in cheek, a little, Steve describes an average day at their home in Olympia, WA like this:

olympicsWe awoke in the luxurious Chateau Staurie (Steve and Laurie’s home) overlooking the calm quiet waters of the bay covered in the usual overnight blanket of low clouds. Views of the Olympics across the water will have to wait a few hours until the clouds burn clear. After a scrumptious breakfast including fresh local raspberries and blueberries from the farmers’ market and a few household chores like feeding the birds and watering the beautiful flowers on the deck over the sound, we gather our paddles and head down the steep path through the firs to the water. firs

At the bottom it is high tide so it is only a short walk with our SUP`s to the cool clear water of Totten Inlet. Totten means “calm” and today it lives up to its name. Glassy AM waters reflect the sky now mottled with breaking morning clouds and totally blue sky. Below the glassy surface swim big and small clear moon jellies and a few of  the large red Lions Mane jellies (the largest species of Jelly Fish) with their 12+ long strands of stingers. In the distance Olympic peaks are showing through the now clearing skies. In a bit under 20 minutes we have crossed the 3/4 mile inlet and now paddle north along the shore to the mouth of Little Skookum Inlet.

totten

 

Today will be a special day. We will get to visit Little Skookum Inlet. It is rarely visited (the closest public launch is 4-5 miles away) and paddling in is tide dependent. Today is perfect. The high tide of 12 feet when we get there will cover the shallow shoals exposed at lower tides.  The current generated when 12 feet of water exits the bathtub of the beautiful narrow winding section of the inlet in just 6 hours as the tide ebbs will treat us to a downtider when we leave.

Skookum shellfish
Skookum shellfish

On the opposite shore we see the only power boat we will see all day. It’s  an oyster harvesting workboat and the workers bringing in Totten’s bountiful shellfish harvest for Taylor Shellfish Company. We will see few people today. The workers, a man mowing his lawn, a couple on the deck of their attractive shore side home and a pretty young woman in a bikini sunbathing on her deck who gets up as we go by (had to throw something special in there to entice the guys ).

As we wind our way through the narrow  fir and cedar lined Little Skookum we are treated to the loud trill and loping flight pattern of several Kingfishers, a small gaggle of geese flying over and landing on the shore, the stately beauty of a bald eagle which flies over and lands in a large Douglas Fir sending out its distinctive call, many ducks and the usual gulls. Cormorants hold vigil on the poles set up for commercial boats, occasionally starting their flight by the dive splash and fly technique that is uniquely theirs. As we reach the end of the narrow section and the big shallow bay at the end of the inlet now covered wit 9 feet of water, but soon to be an empty mud pit.bird

The ebb current is growing strong enough that we can feel it slowing our progress–time to turn back and let it help us paddle. Unfortunately the clear skies brought a NNE wind which funnels in to Skookum inlet as the water funnels out. We don’t get a full out sleigh-ride,, but are only slowed a little until Skookum opens up before dumping in to Totten Inlet.

Mount Rainier watching over Totten Inlet
Mount Rainier watching over Totten Inlet

Here views of the giant Mt. Rainier in the distance reward our extra effort.  After we turn in to Totten Inlet and head south to our beach, the wind is no longer an obstacle. At first it hits us on the quarter before pushing us the last mile. 3+ hours after starting we return to our beach in the warm sun. It feels warmer than the mid 70`s that it is on our protected beach covered in a depp layer of warmth soaking gravel. We rinse and store or boards, climb back up the trail to the house and a well deserved and yummy Linner. That’s our lunch/dinner which includes freshly picked salad from the garden on the deck at Chateau Staurie.