Sea Maui: Catch the”FunBoat” Family

seamaui-sunsetIt’s one thing to sit on the beach and watch the sun kiss the ocean with gold. It is quite another to be skimming over the Pacific on a beautiful catamaran – like the Sea Maui.

Over the past couple of years the Sea Maui team has worked extremely hard at becoming a staple on Ka’anapali beach and making sure their guests have that magical Maui experience. seamaui-interior

We were fortunate to have chosen the snorkel trip over to Lanai on a beautiful Hawaiian day. What an awesome team cared for each of us every minute. We have taken a few catamaran trips with other companies and this experience was far and away the very best. All of the staff is experienced, certified and knowledgeable sailors who take visible pride in what they do.seamaui-crew

From making sure to talk with all the guests, sharing local stories and spotting ocean life (whales, flying fish, spinner dolphin),  there is no mistake that this is Ka’anapali’s “FUN BOAT.” 

Our day began with a catered hot breakfast (with vegan option) but we chose the bacon, local sausage with our eggs and perfectly seasoned rice. Belly full, we lounged on the beanbags and savored a gorgeous passage over to Lanai.seamaui-me

On this 5 hour adventure we traveled to Lanai and snorkeled in the stunning Manele Bay fish sanctuary. We spotted a huge variety of tropical fish – butterflies of many varieties, parrots, tangs, and many more.  The sprawling coral reef seemed to go on forever with formations we hadn’t seen in other snorkel spots.

Once our snorkel time was over we all scrambled back on board ready for the incredible buffet lunch and a premium open bar. The service and attention to every need could not have been better. Because the Sea Maui limits the number of  clients on each trip there was ample time to connect with both the crew and the others on board. seamaui-chat

For a memorable sunset sail be sure to check out the Sea Maui Sunset Live trip! It’s the traditional sunset cocktail sail with upbeat and fun live music performed by popular local musicians. Spice up your night and hop on Sea Maui for some awesome cocktails, tasty food, and some great jams. They don’t call Sea Maui “Ka’anapali’s FUN BOAT” for nothing. These guys really know how to entertain. Real pros! Save your seat today! Book now.

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SUPrepreneur – A New Breed: Jamie Uttley

I have been an entrepreneur all my life, before I had even heard that word or knew its meaning. Each time a challenge presented itself, I invented-created-imagined-designed a plan to solve it. When I taught school there was never enough money for any extras. You can bet I became a champion grant writer, creating an entrepreneurial sort of classroom. Lately I have been developing the Blue Life Journal for Kids and a curriculum to engage and empower the next generation of ocean stewards.

A weird thing happened about 8 years ago when I started this Elder SUP blog – in a way it has been an entrepreneurial adventure. Better – it has been a way to meet amazing people. That experience led me to coin the term “SUPrepreneur.” I plan to share a series of stories of people active and influential in the world of SUP that features their “not quitting my day job” foray into developing their small business direction.

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Meet Jamie Uttley

I am very fortunate to be connected with Starboard and their North American distributors, Trident Sports.  Through that connection I met a cool, hard-working, innovative woman – Jamie Uttley. She recently posted on Facebook a call for all of us to support each other as we start our small businesses. I DEFINITELY want to support her business. It’s small, really new and right up my alley.

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Jamie sells Pure Copper Water Bottles and Copper Straws both Retail and Wholesale. In her own words she explains, “I got my wholesale experience from my job at Trident, which I am grateful for every day! My website is www.coastcopper.com (or www.coastcopper.ca)” Check it out, you will LOVE her products.

There’s a bit of a story behind the bottles. Jamie explains, ” My husband’s mom is a Yoga/Ayurveda Therapist of 30+ years and she is often going to India to teach and travel. Last March, she brought us each a copper bottle and the rest is history!

Not only are they stylish and they are believed to offer certain health benefits based on Ancient Ayurveda. That’s a great value in itself. But, as plastic bottles clog beaches and ocean gyres all over the globe, a reusable bottle is a gift to the ocean.  A reusable bottle eliminates the need for plastic/disposable bottles.

Our products at Coast Copper are sold to pretty much 3 demographics –

  • People who are interested in Ayurveda and Wellness,
  • People who think they look cool (they do!) and lastly and my favourite
  • The people who are looking for a sweet way to reduce their daily use of plastics.

Through my years at Trident I’ve learned so much about ocean conservancy and the issues our environment is currently facing. That is the beauty of the watersports industry – there is so much more than what appears on the surface. Literally and figuratively!”

justrawA beautiful and easy solution to the problem of plastic straws!  Jamie has this to say about her copper straws. “After seeing video after video and email after email from Svein Rasmussen (Founder of Starboard) and my colleagues about the condition of the ocean, it was easy to change my habits.  I’ve always been pretty good but there was room for improvement. Being the type of person that I am, I feel like I need to do what I can to spread the message of reducing our habit of single use plastic. I have no problem now suggesting a restaurant carry paper or no straws – or giving a bartender a hard time for giving me a straw after I have requested not to have one. Straws are simply a habit – and straws are one of the most prevalent beach plastic polluter.

I often post on social media and now with my business I have another avenue to share with people the importance of reduction of our single use plastic habit.”

Columbia River Inn: Home Base for Adventure

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Nestled in an azure bay of the Columbia River

When the sign says “Best Western Plus” along the Oregon side of the Columbia River we have learned THAT’S where to stay in the Columbia Gorge Scenic area. We’ve shared many stories about Hood River Inn about 20 miles east of the  Best Western Plus Columbia River Inn. This trip we decided to soak up the culture, history, hiking, biking, paddling, wine or beer sampling and fishing by staying in Cascade Locks at the base of the incredible “Bridge of the Gods.”

Cascade Locks, Oregon, is located in the middle of the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area, approximately 40 minutes east of Portland International Airport and 20 minutes west of the windsurfing Mecca of Hood River.

On the drive to the Columbia River Inn we passed many scenic waterfalls available from the road or by short hikes. In fact we were surprised to learn how the beauty and diversity of hikes had survived what had been a tough fire season in 2017. Oregonians love their wilderness and are at work restoring trails and natural areas. We learned about so many hiking options which would be amazing in the Fall. William Sullivan’s book, 100 Hikes in Oregon is a great reference – also his website. Some hikes to explore are Gillette Lake, Trout Creek and Snag Creek, all putting you in the footprints of adventurers on the Pacific Crest Trail. Summer volunteers are at many trailheads, if you visit in Fall or Winter, you can check out ReadySetGorge.com for up to date information.

As paddlers, our focus is usually on planning our down wind paddles and fun on the Columbia River. Once we settled in to our spacious river view room at the Columbia River Inn and looked out at the Bridge of the Gods we got curious about what this area was all about. Over the next few days we were much better visitors after spending a few hours at the Columbia Gorge Interpretive Museum (Stevenson, WA). Armed with an appreciation of the history and people who carved out amazing lives and industries we toasted their grit over local wines. The Columbia River Gorge wine region is known as “a world of wine in 40 miles.” bw-6

Recreational options nearby include world-class white water rafting, mountain biking, sail and kite boarding, and year round skiing on the slopes of Mt. Hood. Cascade Locks even has their own historic sternwheeler, the Columbia Gorge, departing daily from the nearby Marine Park for tours of the river.

bw-4We loved planning our day on the sheltered patio just outside of the pool area at the Columbia River Inn. Over coffee in the morning or a local wine in the evening (beer for me) we never tired of the view.

A warm, to-order breakfast that’s included with the room is always a bonus. We loved heading next-door to the Bridgeside Restaurant for local favorites prepared our way. I love crispy hashbrowns. All it took was a request and the golden brown goodness was all mine to enjoy with eggs my way and tasty sausage. There are choices for all tastes, including juice and beverage. Best of all, locals love to eat there, too. We met through hikers off the Pacific Crest Trail as well as other travelers.bs-1

It’s time to look forward to Fall and Winter is this wonderland. Enjoy your trip.

 

Jane McKee: Living Legend – Loving the Racing Life

A few days ago I was following some of Jane McKee’s recent adventures and channel crossings when I noticed Sean Sweet mentioned her as a “Living legend.”  I imagine Jane is simply doing what her heart and soul inspires her to – while having a ton of fun. I wondered, and asked Jane, “Who are some other living legends who have influenced or inspired you lately?” jane-gnarly

Jane replied with this fascinating summary from an inspiring waterwoman, “I just love being on the water. And I love racing! Racing forces me to be a better version of myself, not just physically, but mentally. There is something about pushing your body beyond its comfort level that helps you better able to deal with difficult situations in other parts of your life.

Racing has a meditative effect. When you are out there for hours, you sort through all kinds of things. Sometimes emotional pain is worse than physical pain so I know if I can go out and be on the water, in any capacity, my worries will sort out. It’s like they say, salt water heals. So paddling has a much deeper meaning for me.

nappy.jpgSome people that have inspired me would be my friend Nappy Napolean, who still paddles well into his seventies. He just loves to paddle! And he is such a great  ambassador for the sport. I think the fountain of youth is to keep moving, and he  is a classic example of what you can do.

Jane seemed to excel in so many disciplines throughout 2018. I wondered why she loves each of them each and asked for a hierarchy of how each might serve to cross train the over age 50 water athlete.

Jane shared this: I had a really good OC1 season this year. I never came in less than third place overall in our winter series, including the M2M, Molokai to Oahu one man relay with partner Alan Goo-Frasier, and Olukai races.

jane-sailI came in 8th out of 24 in the Molo solo and won two M2M races on the one man this summer. I also participate in the Hawaiian Sailing Canoe Racing series with Team Hui Nalu. We sail the entire main Hawaiian Island chain over the course of the summer. I have been canoe sailing for 18 years and it is just amazing. I raced the Napali one man race and the Napali Challenge 6 man race recently.

I just completed my first M2O SUP race with team mates Jen Fuller and Kristin Thomas. We had a blast and won our division!

I had decided last year to not race with a club anymore for 6 man. I have been paddling 6 man for 26 years and realized that summer offers a whole new world of opportunities for fun racing in all venues that I had been missing out on.

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Photo Credit: M Pauole

It is interesting, that since I have been paddling SUP, my OC1 paddling has improved. SUP provides the strength training and OC1 my cardio and speed, they really compliment each other. I say padding a SUP is like Crossfit on a board!

I cannot even contemplate such a full schedule of events – especially across one sweet summer. Jane seems to be hopping from event to event, I asked her to describe her in-between training routine. To what does she attribute your success?

This response came easily to Jane: I think my success is attributed to the love of racing and paddling. I love the excitement of racing, getting ready, the nerves at the start line and the knowledge that it ain’t over till it’s over! I won some of my races last year by a hair, literally down to the second, so knowing that will push you to the end.

As far as training, I try to split the workouts between SUP and OC1. I find I can only do SUP about 2-3X a week so have to hop on my OC1 to rotate muscle groups so I don’t get over use injuries. I am a huge proponent of massage therapy, I go on an average of once a week.

Okay, you made it this far in the article and now comes the “STORY!” Enjoy it!

Jand McKee and the 2018 M2O

100SO! I had been escorting people for the M2O for a few years, Armie Armstrong from NZ, Annabel Anderson, and a Brazilian Prone paddler last year. I have crossed the Kaiwi channel more than 50 times between OC1, 6man and sailing canoe, but never on a SUP.  Kristin Thomas and Jen Fuller from California were my Facebook friends and I knew they were good paddlers, so I threw it out to them to do a team together.

They were keen, so we were all set to race! We decided to call ourselves Team C&H (California and Hawaii, get it?) They came a few days before the race and we did a few downwinders, and that is all the practice the got before the channel. I was really proud of how they did especially because it turned out to be one of the toughest channels in a decade. A dumping tide made it sticky, crazy disorganized swell, everyone said it was hard.  I have a lot of respect for the athletes that do M2O solo. 100-award

I think the best part of the race was coming away with some wonderful new friends! I had always heard such great things about Jen and Kristin and now I have a whole new group of amazing women athletes as gal pals! We laugh that we will be doing this race together until we are 100.

 

Cali Paddler: If You Paddle You Get It

The thing that caught my eye and got me very interested in Cali Paddler was a challenge posted on Facebook. It was the “Trash Pickup Challenge” for World Ocean Day. But it’s a habit we can enjoy every day. From the website, “For every mile we paddlers enjoy, let’s commit to one piece of trash. Do #cpcleanup in a photo post on social media of your mileage and equivalent trash haul (from the water or beach after) and watch how your actions will inspire others.” Our actions can inspire others. This simple truth resonates in an essay by Greg Gagnon

I was struck Greg’s question of “How a single bottle cap can alter the future” got to the heart of both the problem and the solution in a few short paragraphs in his essay. Simple and profound “After a while, a gentleman walked up to me and asked why I was picking up plastic bottle caps. You are no doubt shaking your head, saying to yourself ‘really dude?,’ and I felt that way too. I told him, “they don’t belong on our beaches or in our oceans. Animals eat them, they don’t biodegrade, and it’s just plain nasty.
The gentleman said to me, “what’s the point? It won’t matter if you pick it up, because down the beach there are far more people dropping them, who could care less about it anyway.”

“I was struck thinking how two people could posses such different points of view. My point of view was one of hope, compassion, effort, and possibility. His view was who cares, why bother, save your energy because it won’t make a difference.”

How can we change the way the world treats plastic – and the Ocean – through connecting hope, compassion, effort and possibility?

Co-founder, Clarke Graves, filled in some more background, “At Cali Paddler, we feel that community is a solution to many things. And there are a LOT of paddlers out there. So, if we can build momentum as a whole to make it our everyday practice to be good stewards, that it will trickle on to other non-paddlers as well. We encourage paddlers to attend cleanup events, or host their own, help with petitions to reduce plastics and Styrofoam, and hold races and events accountable to be eco-friendly, that we can affect a lot of positive change. We also feel that it is our duty to shine a spotlight on those doing amazing things. And re-enforce their behavior with well-deserved public praise. For that reason we started our CP Spotlight program awhile back that does just that.

Sometimes making a difference seems daunting, but any effort, big or small is important, so we try to share every day tips, that don’t take a lot of effort but can go a long way, such as reusable coffee mugs, declining straws, carrying water bottles to name a few.

cali-1Cali Paddler takes their community building efforts further through their Paddle Pledge program. Clarke explains it like this, “When Cali Paddler launched in 2015 we established our Paddle Pledge. Where we take 5% of all proceeds (not just profits mind you) and donate quarterly to wonderful groups and non-profits that make a solid difference in our waterways, on our beaches, and with our wildlife.

Initially we had 4 amazing groups that customers would choose from. Then in 2016 we added a specific ‘Cause Product’ to benefit a certain non-profit. In 2017 we took our model to a new level, where now every quarter we switch to a new non-profit to donate to and promote. This lets us give exposure to more groups, and support regions. Since our launch, paddlers who have bought our products have supported groups like Keep Tahoe Blue, Clean Oceans International, H20 Trash Patrol, Ocean Discovery Institute, Cal State Parks, San Diego Coast Keeper, and the Marine Mammal Center.” cali2

Cali Paddler is full of E.P.I.C. paddlers (Every Paddler In California). Like one of their featured paddlers, Loraine Gruber, I did the Battle of the Paddle in 2013 at age 64 – and won my age group (no one else was in it LOL!!!!) I love the idea that everyone can be E.P.I.C and an ambassador. I asked Clarke to tell us more about E.P.I.C. individuals that have been real “stars” in your eyes.

Clarke replied, “Oh wow, what a fun question. When we first started, we made it a point to not neglect anyone in our paddle community. Too often we felt companies catered to the elite, or a certain demographic. And yet it was the every-day-paddler who really made us love this sport. We made it our mantra to ‘Be EPIC’ (Every Paddler in California)! We make it a point to shine a light on those who may not be the fastest, but enjoy the sport the most, and those who help teach and share their stoke in the community. There are plenty of companies out there that will cater to the top 1%, a certain age, or body type. But we aim to embrace inclusivity to the max. Because really, paddling is fun, healthy and a lifestyle, regardless of who you are…if you paddle, you get it. cali3

As to who some of our favorite individuals are, we hesitate to name individuals, but there are a few things that just really make us beam…
• People who smile when they paddle.
• Loan their craft to anyone interested in trying it out.
• Are willing to paddle anywhere, anytime, on any craft.
• and finally, those who cheer for the paddlers in front of them, and the ones behind them.

Community building across a state as large as California is a huge task. Social media is a tool that helps Cali Paddler. Their approach is a great example for any paddling organization hoping to connect “their” community.
Clarke shared some tips, “Social media is a big tool for us. We use it, along with our website, to share events, groups and news. Too often the little races or shops get overlooked, so we do what we can spread the word about them in our calendars, directories, and social media. We also try our best to tell the stories of paddlers in their own words, about their experiences and knowledge. We have had locals share their favorite paddle places, stories of overcoming fear, showcased people taking on huge paddle challenges, and written about safety issues so can all come home with a smile after a paddle. Our main hashtag is our slogan #ifyoupaddleyougetit.
I asked Clarke to tell me some more about Cali Padller’s trash pickup challenge #miles = #pieces of trash. He shared, “In honor of World Oceans Day, we launched what we call the CP Clean Up Challenge (#cpCleanUp). It is our goal to create a new normal for when we finished a paddle, to pick up trash. Many awesome paddlers already do this, but we figured we could put a little twist on it by suggesting paddlers pick-up one piece of trash for every mile they paddle. So, if you get 4 miles in, then before you leave the beach or dock after, you hunt down 4 pieces of trash. We then encourage people on social media to tag #cpCleanUp with a picture of their trash, and maybe their gps data. Others will see this effort, and hopefully take part as well, and it will become a badge of honor and a movement as we earn the miles we got to enjoy. Word on the street is we will be reaching out to folks too we see taking part and occasionally sending out a little something as a thank you.”

Throughout the year Cali Paddler hosts cleanups as well. In the past they have done a July 5th cleanup with various locations in the state. Last year they had 11 locations that they supported and promoted where teams, businesses and individuals adopted a beach to clean after the 4th of July celebrations. They provide their reusable Cali Paddler Blue Buckets (#cpBlueBucket) to these efforts and to anyone who wants to have cleanups on their on schedule and make a difference.

Want to get some cool products and give back 5% in the process? Even if you don’t live in California you might like the spring launched Golden Poppy Design t-shirt (California’s state flower) which is printed on a tri-blend of recycled plastic, organic cotton and acrylic. It is soft, sturdy and one of many products they offer with an eye on the environment. cali4
Clarke concludes his interview with, “We understand that our business model of being a lifestyle brand (clothing and hats) is based on consumerism, so we try and make efforts to introduce eco-friendly items whenever possible. Just like all our products, 5% of proceeds from sales of this goes to non-profits. Currently the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito California!”
How cool if every state developed their own State-Paddler-community!

Enter a Race – For the Clinic, Friends and Fun

It was one of those summer days that dawns with bluebird sky and warms with sunshine, community and good friends on the water – it was the Bend Paddle Challenge. I hadn’t participated in many races in the past 5 years, but with an eye on the 2018 Columbia Gorge Paddle Challenge and my Starboard Freeride 12’2″ X 30 paddleboard I felt trained enough to race the 5 miles. Even though most of the racers had 12’6″ or 14′ boards, I was fine with my board choice – this was a chance to do a hard training paddle with an event wrapped around it.

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The event kicked off on Friday night with a clinic by KIALOA paddles ‘Elele, Brett Saguid, on the lawn by the river behind Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe.  The two things I learned at that clinic that were so valuable during (the grueling) five mile race were:

    1. When going into the wind keep your body lower and feather your paddle on the return. I knew this, but in the last mile when the wind funneled strong into my face going into the final buoy turn area it was a great reminder.
    2. Take your paddle out at your toes for best lift and efficiency. Again, I knew this but when fatigue suggests leaving the paddle in the water “just a little longer” between strokes it was a great reminder. I made that my mantra, and used it to keep a solid paddle rhythm. My little “I am TIRED” brain had a different bpc-2script – and the result was a lot more fun throughout the entire race.

The buoys were placed for maximum spectator engagement so we had 10 buoy turns in 5 miles. This was great for me too. Since I was the old lady at the back of the pack, as I was coming in to turns I got to watch the trains of faster paddlers zoom by, sharing shouts of encouragement – or just a smile if we were too breathless to shout. I even got to the share a buoy turn with the 1st place winner, Brett, as he lapped me on my mile 3 and his mile 4.

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Thanks for the support and stoke throughout the entire race, Eva Scherer (1st Place)

So, I came in third (and I came in a few paddlers from last). It wasn’t because of my age category, there were no age categories. I got third because there were only 5 women entered in the event. It’s always fun to podium and the bonus was the cool pint-glass as trophy from Sunriver Brewing. But it would also have been great to have more women participating. I can totally understand some anxiety before doing “A RACE.”

But a switch in mindset could make participation much more inviting to first timers. For one, the Bend Paddleboard Challenge had a 1 mile sprint race with great energy, lots of novice participants (and some speedy experienced racers). Then there was the 5 person relay with a beach start.

Every participant was on the same KIALOA 12’6″ inflatable board. Spills and thrills and laughs were the name of the game.  There were almost as many people in the relay event as the main 5 mile event. And that’s the biggest bonus at a community SUP race – getting to know new people and having an amazing good time.

Taking advantage of pre-race clinics and meeting novice and experienced paddlers on land (over a beer – thanks, Sunriver Brewing) all add up to the best of our sport.

This video shows the beautiful day, the start on our in-town Deschutes River. I am on blue board with blue shirt and blue hat – hanging in there with a grin.