Tag Archives: SUP fitness

SUP Addiction: The Glide

Innocently, you join friends and fellow competitors for your first down wind SUP adventure. River, lake or open ocean – when the wind and the bumps cooperate the experience is incredible.

There’s so much to think about – paddle stroke, wind and wave direction, safety around rocks, channels, tankers or current and your own stamina and ability.  Whether your first run was 3 miles and easy or a kick-your-butt challenge, it’s likely you emerged from the adventure a different person.  Perhaps, like so many of us, all you can think about is doing it AGAIN! Yup, you’re hooked.

In between opportunities to do down winders, SUP Magazine has an online series that can provide tips and insights any time.  Take a look at the Glide Guide.

Some take-away tips from the video (see below) of Jeremy Riggs training Justin Gordon include:

The key thing keeping up your momentum.  Shorter rapid paddle strokes keep momentum going – keep speed up

Don’t go right up the back of the wave in front of you – that will slow you down and you paddle UP.

Look for the place to keep the momentum going, a place to guide the board into the trough where you can catch the next bump – and have tons more FUN!

SUP Circuit Training

Suzie Cooney at Suzie Trains Maui will be providing a super SUP training for those of you fortunate to be in Maui on November 3rd, 2012. She will be at Lumeria Maui doing a “hands on” SUP workshop that will up the  SUP performance for all levels among the attendees.

I would love to be there to get insights for the 30-week “Ed’s Journey Back to SUP Fitness” after shoulder surgery. Here are some topics that will be covered:

  • Preparing Your Body for the sport of Stand Up Paddling
  • Ocean Preparedness & Water Safety
  • Preparing for the famous Maui Maliko Downwinders (Looking forward to doing a few of these the first week of May 2013! Woohoo!)
  • Equipment and Gear Review: Boards provided by Naish International
  • SUP Techniques – Fine Tuning Your Skills – Finding your “power” in your stroke
  • SUP Fitness Training Demos and Group Participation

Until we are ready for all the training Suzie will be sharing, we are piecing together training from a combination of our own experience and actual paddling.

The weather is turning cooler in Central Oregon, but the weekend promises some 80 degree highs. Some paddling will be on the agenda, but as our home gym shapes up we will be starting on some circuit training. Circuit training is great because you can get your heart rate going, build muscle and muscle endurance. We will do something like spin cycle that elevates our heart rate followed by a couple exercises that include strength and balance. Once a 5-10 minute cardio session is done we will move right into some kettle ball swings (from a squat position swinging the kettle ball to shoulder height coming to a standing position) and repeat.  We don’t own the actual “kettle balls” so we will use a handweight with a strap, the Heavyhands brand.  Right now we will use a range from 3-7 lbs. Ed is still watching what he does with the shoulder very carefully.

I am not injured so I plan to  move into a plank position with elbows on a ball and roll the ball forward and back for 20 reps. Ed will do a modified move on the stability ball recommended by his PT trainer, Craig, at Therapeutic Associates. We will do this circuit 3 times and then move on to another circuit that includes some moves on the Indo Board.

Another idea of a circuit we might do would be to start with something like 15 split jumps on each leg. I go gingerly on these due to 5 knee (ACL and meniscus) surgeries over the past 6 years. I jump carefully straight up and land softly.  Next we can add about 20 tricep dips then 20 reverse crunches. It is a solid workout when we repeat this circuit another two times. Basically, we plan to come up with some circuits of three exercises. The first exercise of the series will be something that will elevates our heart rate ( jump rope, running stairs or the canyon hill behind the house, sprints on a spin bike). We’ll add a strength exercise ( kettle bells, push ups, tricep dips, pull ups, etc…) then add in a core exercise ( reverse crunch, plank, medicine ball sit up and throws). After we finish one circuit of three we’ll then move on to another.

What’s your dry land training program? We’d love to hear from you!

Summer SUP – Winter Training

Sitting here in the wintery world of ski-season, quads wonderfully shredded from 3 days finding off-piste fun, I started thinking about some compression tights to wear pre and post exercise. I remembered that Karen Wrenn was wearing something when she visited one of our river races last summer so I took a quick look at her website to determine what brand was good for SUP. Bummer, I can’t tell from this photo.  No problem though. I had the chance to explore Karen’s website and blog – great information right when I need it.

Just in time for paddling season this year I will be turning 63 (for real???) and staying ready to paddle in races and long tours is a priority. I “enter” races but I don’t “race.” While every stroke is the strongest I can muster at the time, and the camaraderie of the race is so much fun, I am usually the last to cross the finish line on my 11’3″ Amundson.  Occasionally I borrow a race board, most recently from Dave and Meg at Kialoa, but my agenda is all about the paddle in the water, the connection between heart/lungs/muscle/sights/sounds and friends on the water. Training for all that is important.

Reading about Karen’s busy life as mother of three and the off-season whether she deals with in Portland was inspiring.  She suggests ways to stay motivated and carving out the 45 minutes or so needed to stay in shape.  Especially interesting is her explanation of her cross-training routine.

On her blog, Karen explains,  “Circuit training is great because you can get your heart rate going, build muscle and muscle endurance. I will first do something that elevates my heart rate followed by a couple exercises that include strength and balance. For example, I might do 20 double jumps (or you could do 100-150 single jumps) with a jump rope and then move right into 20 kettle ball swings (from a squat position swinging the kettle ball to shoulder height coming to a standing position) and repeat. Then I would move into a plank position with elbows on a ball and roll the ball forward and back for 20 reps. I would do this circuit 3 times and then move on to another circuit.

Another idea of a circuit is to do 15 split jumps on each leg (http://www.livestrong.com/video/5310-split-jumps/) and then 20 tri-cep dips then 20 reverse crunches (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVVlXA0dqGg) and repeat this circuit another two times. Basically, come up with some circuits of three exercises. Have the first exercise of the series be something that will elevate your heart rate ( jump rope, running stairs, sprints on a rowing machine) add a strength exercise ( kettle bells, push ups, tricep dips, pull ups, etc…) then add in a core exercise ( reverse crunch, plank, medicine ball sit up and throws). After you finish one circuit of three then move on to another.

Bye, for now! I am heading to the gym and then to the trail. SUP season will be here before we know it. How do YOU train off-season?